Event: Can social media work for me?

A round-table discussion organised by the Social Media Knowledge Exchange
12.30-2pm Thursday 19 November
SG2, Alison Richard Building

With Barney Brown, Rachel Holmes, Jose Marcaida, and the Doing History in Public project

This event is free to attend and open to PhD students, researchers and other staff at the University of Cambridge

Eventbrite - Can social media work for me?

Social media is part of everyday life for millions of people but can you make platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and Storify work for you in your academic career? What are the challenges posed by using commercial social media platforms to disseminate your research or communicate with academic colleagues? How are PhD students and early career researchers in Cambridge making social media work for them?

Whether you are experienced in using social media for scholarly communication or just curious to see if these platforms and tools can help your academic career, come and join the conversation at the first Social Media Knowledge Exchange event this year.

Topics for discussion

– How do I decide which tools to use for different purposes and audiences?
– How can I find training and advice on social media use?
– How much of my personal thoughts and tastes should I share online?
– What benefits and drawbacks are there to using social media as a researcher?

We’ll also be asking you to help us decide what kind of practical sessions we should organise in our programme of events this year – so this is your chance to tell us which tools and skills you want us to cover.

About the speakers:

Barney Brown‘s career in Digital Communications has been split between web development and communications teams spanning the education sector, the Forestry Commission and the music industry. As Head of Digital Communications at the University of Cambridge, Barney works in a team of three focussing on the production of guidelines and assets to aid in the management of thousands of websites and social media profiles

Rachel E. Holmes is a Research Associate on the ERC-funded project Crossroads of Knowledge in Early Modern England: The Place of Literature hosted by CRASSH/Faculty of English. She works transnationally on early modern European law and literature, with a particular focus on marriage, contractual faith, and the difficult status of proof in sexual matters.

José Ramón Marcaida
(CRASSH, University of Cambridge) is a Research Associate on the ERC-funded ‘Genius Before Romanticism: Ingenuity in Early Modern Art and Science’ research project. He works on the intersections between the worlds of science and art from the Age of Discovery to the Enlightenment.

Doing History in Publicis a collaborative blog written and edited by graduate historians both at the University of Cambridge (where most of the editors are based) and elsewhere. The blog is intended to cover a diverse range of historical periods, countries and themes.

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